The one New Year’s Resolution EVERYONE should have

New Year's Resolution for 2015 and onwards-- No more food shaming!
New Year’s Resolution for 2015 and onwards– No more food shaming!

With 2015 approaching, many of us are making new year’s resolutions. At the top of the list is usually, “get healthy”, “eat better”, “exercise”, etc..

And all of this is great! Everyone should have the goal of living the healthiest life possible.

To help with that, Positive Eats would like to add the following Resolution to EVERYONE’s list:

*****^^~~NO MORE FOOD SHAMING!~~^^*****

Got it? That mean’s no more commenting (either out loud or even thinking in your head!) on the food choices of others–especially negative comments! No more “that’s going to make you fat”, “oh you must be on a diet”, “is she really going to eat that?”, “did you know that Food X is bad for you?”. NO MORE!

No more labeling foods as good or bad, and especially NO MORE LABELING PEOPLE by the foods they eat!

You have no idea why someone is eating what they are eating, and you have no reason to judge another individual’s food choices. So stop it. Now.

Food shaming stems from the belief that certain foods have certain moral values, and that is wrong wrong wrong. ALL FOODS OFFER NUTRITION. Choose to look at foods objectively (or positively:)), as vehicles of nutrition, as just plain ol’ foods! And move on with life. And don’t bug others!

Now go celebrate the New Year! And tell us, do you agree with this New Year’s Resolution?

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Positive Influences

Stumbled upon this article online, and thought it was a great example of what our focus should be in shaping young children’s eating habits–POSITIVITY.

This is especially applicable to parents and caretakers. Set up a positive eating environment and having a positive relationship with food. The following statement rings true with the Positive Eats mantra:

Foods that are high in calories, fat, sugar and salt like cakes, chocolate, cookies, doughnuts, ice cream, french fries, potato chips, pop, sports and energy drinks, and sweetened hot or cold drinks should be eaten less often. When you limit these foods yourself, your children will be less likely to eat them as well.

It is important not to label these foods as “bad”. They are simply foods to be eaten occasionally and in moderation.

Perfect. The article also states not to force children to eat anything, and also to avoid using food as a reward or punishment. Food is there to nourish our bodies. Children should not be pressured to eat a certain amount, but rather allowed to choose from a variety of options you as parents provide based on hunger level.

Positive eating is truly the best way to help future generations develop healthy eating habits. We need to set an example. A positive one 🙂

What are some positive eating strategies you abide by?