Which kind of beer has the most iron?

We’ve published a few posts on the nutrients in beer, but today we’re going to talk about Beer and Iron. It is estimated that only 65-70 % of Americans get enough iron in their diet, and women (because of menstruation) are particularly prone to low levels of this essential mineral.

A study published in the Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, examined 40 different beers, and found that heavier, darker beers have almost 50% more iron than light beers.

The darker the beer, the more iron!
The darker the beer, the more iron!

A pint of Guinness has about 0.3 mg of iron, and the recommended daily intake for the “average” adult is around 10 mg per day…so while beer is not the highest source of iron in the grand scheme of foods, if you’re thinking about this particular nutrient when our drinking with friends, consider getting some of the dark stuff! 😀

Cheers!

It’s time for Red Wine!

Red Wine, like all other alcoholic beverages, does not include a nutrition label.

This is because alcoholic beverages are regulated by the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB), rather than the FDA. The TTB does not require nutrition labeling.

So how does one figure out the nutrition in a drink such as Red Wine?

Do you know the nutrition in Red Wine?

A simple internet search of course!

On average, a 5-6 oz (one serving size) glass of red wine will have about 150 calories, 5 grams of carbohydrates (roughly 2% RDA), 6% RDA Potassium, 5% Iron, and about 1% Calcium! Neat!

It is also helpful to know that the basic ingredients in red wine are grapes, sugar, and yeast. The potassium in wine may come from the soil where the grapes are harvested from.

Do some research on the web to find out about the nutritional info of your favorite alcoholic beverage. Are you surprised by anything? Do you think drinks should include a nutritional label to help us make the best health decisions? Let us know in the comments below!